Unit Plan for Implementing Film in a Language Arts Curriculum

students_film.jpg

Introduction
Students in today’s classroom have grown up with technology. They are the iPod generation, Facebook users, and cell phone addicts. Today’s learners are used to visual depictions. Naturally, a student would be able to see a text unfold in front of them better with visuals than reading the text in words. While students have had exposure to literary elements traditionally in previous grades, the eighth grade curriculum should take a different approach to help students solidify their foundation of the elements. Therefore, giving students visual examples of the literary elements, such as plot, characterization, point of view, setting and symbolism, would provide a unique learning experience that will tap into students’ technological interests and build on their comprehension of the literary elements.

Background
Students take an interest in the visual mediums that exist around them. Therefore, it is only natural that film will appeal to learners, especially those that have a limited interest in the curriculum from the start. In “Reel Teaching = Real Learning: Motivating Reluctant Students Through Film Studies,” Brad Smilanich and Nicole Lafreniere (2010) state that “film offers an immediacy and accessibility that the printed text frequently does not” (p. 604). Film can enhance concepts found in the English classroom. In fact, students can comprehend reading pieces better because of film. By analyzing a filmmaker’s literary or cinematic choices, students can transition to a print text and see the reasoning behind an author’s choice of words (Smilanich and Lafreniere, 2010, p. 605). Smilanich and Lafreniere go on to point out that current students are part of the “video generation,” with capable students that could learn something new with film studies and struggling learners that could enhance their reading strategies/skills (p. 605). Classrooms are comprised of various learners with various capabilities. Introducing film studies to a language arts classroom cannot only serve as a helpful tool, but can also appeal to the students that crave to learn something in a non-traditional way.

Watching a film is more than entertainment. In fact, if looked at critically, a film can help with critical and analytical skills. In the classroom, film can be another resource that teachers can utilize to assist in teaching several topics. For example, students can train their brains to “read” a film much like they do when they read a literary piece. In Reading in the Dark John Golden (2001), a well-known advocate for teaching film in the secondary classroom, states that “watching and analyzing movies seemed to greatly affect their ability to read and critique literature” (p. xiv). The Film Foundation (2002) created the National Film Study Standards, which encompass film language, historical/cultural contexts, production/creative expression, viewers’ response/aesthetic value, and cross-curricular connections (p. 144).

Additionally, in their text Reel Conversations: Reading Films with Young Adults, Alan Teasley and Ann Wilder (1997) advocate for film in the English classroom by providing a rationale for film instruction. Teasley and Wilder supply a rationale for including film in the English/language arts curriculum, which includes:
Students have prior experience with film – almost all of it positive; film is already being used in English classrooms anyway – and often in ways that are a disservice to film; film is an art form that has a rightful place in the English curriculum; viewing a film provides opportunities for discussion and writing; and in recent years there has been a growing interest in the role of “non-print” media in the English classroom (pp. 4-7).

Incorporating film into the secondary English curriculum is crucial because of its appeal to today’s students. It spruces up a lesson and provides the visual depiction that many learning styles need. Not to mention, according to Teasley and Wilder, film can spark vital classroom discussions and can lead to worthy writing assignments, both of which will create a rich learning experience for students. Teasley and Wilder encourage teachers to use film not only to show students a different way of watching film, but to help with reading skills, too. “When they (students) engage with film and video in active ways, they continue to develop many of the same skills we value in our literature curriculum” (Teasley & Wilder, 1997, p. 2).
Some of the literary values that students will find in film are defined by Golden (2001):
- Characterization: “what defines, motivates, or is unique about a particular character…including actions, thoughts, emotions, and speech” (p. 61).
- Setting: “can play an important role in terms of the story and can even act almost as a symbol for the themes of the rest of the film” (p. 68).
- Point of View: “how the choice of narration affects what we, the audience, know or feel about a subject” (pp. 71 – 72).
- Symbol: “an element that is repeated throughout a work” (p. 82).

For the purpose of this unit plan, students will study these identified literary elements in film as a supplement to the exploration of the following short stories:
- “The Three Little Pigs” by Joseph Jacobs
- “The Landlady” by Roald Dahl
- “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe
- “There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury
- “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs

In addition to these five short stories, characterization, setting, point of view, and symbol will be investigated with clips from the following films:
- Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959)
- Notorious (Alfred Hitchcock, 1941)
- The Breakfast Club (John Hughes, 1985)
- Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)

The three stages of this unit plan are Embrace, Explore and Extend. Each stage is broken down by day with each day consisting of an 80-minute instructional block. Students will complete numerous formative assessments throughout the “Embrace” and “Explore” stages. The unit’s summative assessment will be completed in the “Extend” stage.
Embrace (Days 1 – 2)
- Introduction/Review of literary terms, using overview notes.
- Review the elements of a plot map with a universal graphic organizer.
- Discuss the main parts of a basic narrative structure (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action and conflict/resolution), using “The Three Little Pigs” as an example.
- Introduction (basic overview) of film terminology, including framing, focus, camera angles, lighting, camera movement, editing techniques and mise-en-scene, with overview notes and “the paper camera” tool.
Explore (Days 3 – 10)
- Read/Discuss “The Landlady” and analyze a film clip from Vertigo, focusing on setting.
- Read/Discuss “The Tell-Tale Heart” and analyze a film clip from Notorious, focusing on point of view.
- Read/Discuss “There Will Come Soft Rains” and analyze a film clip from The Breakfast Club, focusing on characterization.
- Read/Discuss “The Monkey’s Paw” and analyze a film clip from Psycho, focusing on symbolism.
Extend (Days 11 – 14)
- In groups, students will create a storyboard activity for one of the unit’s short stories.
Applicable PA Standards/Anchors for this unit:
  • 1.1.8.A: apply appropriate strategies to interpret and analyze author’s purpose, using grade level text.
  • R8.A.1: understand fiction appropriate to grade level.
  • R8.B.1.1: interpret, compare, describe, analyze, and evaluate components of fiction.
  • 1.3.8.A: read, understand and respond to works from various genres of literature.
  • 1.3.8.C: analyze the use of literary elements by an author including: characterization, setting, plot, theme, point of view, tone and style.
  • 1.9.8.A: use media and technology resources to support personal productivity, group collaboration and learning throughout the curriculum.
Applicable 8th grade Core Standards for this unit:
  • Reading Standards for Literature 6-12
2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
3. Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
7. Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Writing Standards 6-12
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization and analysis of relevant content.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • National Film Study Standards for Middle School – see PDF for Film Foundation’s explanations:
1.0: Film Language
2.0: Historical and Cultural Contexts
3.0: Production and Creative Expressions
4.0: Viewers’ Response and Aesthetic Value
5.0: Cross-Curricular Connections
LESSON PLANS

Day 1

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Acquire and take notes on the unit’s literary terms.
  • Review the elements of a plot map.
  • Discuss “The Three Little Pigs” as a narrative piece.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Introduce/provide notes for literary terms, including protagonist, antagonist, exposition, setting, plot, rising action, climax, falling action, conflict/resolution, theme, characterization, point of view, and symbol.
  2. Review the elements of a plot map – see blank graphic organizer
  3. Read “The Three Little Pigs” and discuss the parts of a narrative: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and conflict/resolution.
  4. Acquire/take notes on literary terms, including protagonist, antagonist, exposition, setting, plot, rising action, climax, falling action, conflict/resolution, theme, characterization, point of view and symbol.
  5. Using a blank graphic organizer, review the elements of a plot map.
  6. Read “The Three Little Pigs,” discussing the parts of a narrative, such as exposition, rising action, climax, falling action and conflict/resolution.
  1. Acquire/take notes on literary terms, including protagonist, antagonist, exposition, setting, plot, rising action, climax, falling action, conflict/resolution, theme, characterization, point of view and symbol.
  2. Using a blank graphic organizer, review the elements of a plot map.
  3. Read “The Three Little Pigs,” discussing the parts of a narrative, such as exposition, rising action, climax, falling action and conflict/resolution.
Assessments - In Class: identifying the narrative elements in “The Three Little Pigs”
Materials: Literary elements notes, blank plot map graphic organizer, copy of “The Three Little Pigs”

Day 2

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Receive a basic overview of film studies terminology.
  • Interpret film studies terminology, using a paper “camera.”
  • Provide a mini-rationale for using a film technique with “The Three Little Pigs.”
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Provide a basic overview of film terminology, including framing, focus, camera angles, lighting, camera movement, editing techniques and mise-en-scene, note-taking and “the paper camera” tool – see Golden pp. 1-23 and pp. 155-156.
  2. Explain the activity of connecting a film technique to use with “The Three Little Pigs.”
  3. Take notes on film terminology, including framing, focus, camera angles, lighting, camera movement, editing techniques and mise-en-scene.
  4. Apply knowledge of film terminology, using “the paper camera” tool activity.
  5. Choose a film technique to apply to “The Three Little Pigs” and write an explanation.
  1. Take notes on film terminology, including framing, focus, camera angles, lighting, camera movement, editing techniques and mise-en-scene.
  2. Apply knowledge of film terminology, using “the paper camera” tool activity.
  3. Choose a film technique to apply to “The Three Little Pigs” and write an explanation.
Assessments: HW: Finish “Three Little Pigs” film technique activity; In Class: “Paper Camera” activity
Materials: film terminology notes, paper (for “cameras”)

Day 3

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Create a comprehensive list of applicable film techniques for “The Three Little Pigs.”
  • Read/Discuss “The Landlady” and fill out a plot map for it.
  • Analyze the setting of “The Landlady.”
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Discuss students’ “Three Little Pigs”/film technique activity and compile a class list.
  2. Read/Discuss “The Landlady.”
  3. Model filling out a blank plot map with the short story.
  4. Explain the setting w/s, focusing on column 2 – see Golden p. 164.
  5. Using the completed homework, discuss the “Three Little Pigs”/film technique activity to compile a class list.
  6. Read/Discuss “The Landlady.”
  7. Fill out a plot map for the story.
  8. Complete the 2nd column of the setting w/s – see Golden p. 164.
  1. Using the completed homework, discuss the “Three Little Pigs”/film technique activity to compile a class list.
  2. Read/Discuss “The Landlady.”
  3. Fill out a plot map for the story.
  4. Complete the 2nd column of the setting w/s – see Golden p. 164.
Assessments: HW: Finish the 2ndcolumn of the setting w/s; In Class: “Three Little Pigs”/film technique activity, “The Landlady” plot map, setting w//s
Materials: chart paper, “The Landlady” text, blank plot map graphic organizer, setting w/s

Day 4

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Use a visual form of setting in Vertigo to understand the literary element.
vertigo.jpg
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Analyze Vertigo film clip with students, highlighting setting:
- Read Golden’s summary – see pp. 70-71.
- Show Golden’s segment: 0:57:34 – 1:01:37.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwTorpeFFjo&feature=related
- Discuss Golden’s Q?s on p. 71.
- Review first column of setting w/s – see Golden p. 164.
- Assign setting drawing activity – see Golden p. 164.
  1. Analyze Vertigo film clip, highlighting setting:
- Hear Golden’s summary – see pp. 70-71.
- Watch Golden’s segment: 0:57:34 – 1:01:37.
- Discuss Golden’s Q?s on p. 71.
- Complete the first column of setting w/s – see Golden p. 164.
- Do the setting drawing activity – see Golden p. 164.
Assessments: HW: Finish setting drawing activity and setting column w/s; In Class: Discussion Q?s, setting w/s
Materials: Vertigo, DVD player, Reading in the Dark text, setting w/s

Day 5

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Read/Discuss “The Tell-Tale Heart,” studying the literary element of point of view.
  • Learn about the three types of point of view in film.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Collect setting worksheet and setting drawing activity.
  2. Read/Discuss “The Tell-Tale Heart,” highlighting the point of view characteristics in the story.
  3. Give notes on the three types of point of view in film – see Golden pp. 71-74.
  4. Show students the example of the three types – see Golden p. 75.
  5. Hand in setting worksheet and setting drawing activity.
  6. Read/Discuss “The Tell-Tale Heart,” studying the point of view characteristics in the story.
  7. Take notes on the three types of point of view in film – see Golden pp. 71-74.
  8. Look at the example of the three types of point of view – see Golden p. 75.
  1. Hand in setting worksheet and setting drawing activity.
  2. Read/Discuss “The Tell-Tale Heart,” studying the point of view characteristics in the story.
  3. Take notes on the three types of point of view in film – see Golden pp. 71-74.
  4. Look at the example of the three types of point of view – see Golden p. 75.
Assessments: HW: Complete a plot map for “The Tell-Tale Heart”; In Class: point of view discussion of “The Tell-Tale Heart”
Materials: “The Tell-Tale Heart” text, Reading in the Dark text, point of view notes, point of view overhead (Golden – p. 75)

Day 6

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Use a visual form of point of view in Notorious to understand the literary element.
notorious.jpg
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Collect “Tell-Tale Heart” plot map.
  2. Analyze Notorious film clip with students, highlighting point of view:
- Read Golden’s summary – see pp. 74-76.
- Show Golden’s segment: 1:25:00 – 1:28:30.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD6N93bWpuA&feature=related
- Discuss Golden’s Q?s on p. 76.
- Monitor students as they complete a POV worksheet in partners, like the Golden p.75 example studied in class.
  1. Hand in “Tell-Tale Heart” plot map.
  2. Analyze Notorious film clip, highlighting point of view:
- Hear Golden’s summary – see pp. 74-76.
- Watch Golden’s segment: 1:25:00 – 1:28:30.
- Discuss Golden’s Q?s on p. 76.
- Complete a POV worksheet in partners, like the Golden p.75 example studied in class.
Assessments: In Class: Notorious discussion, POV ws
Materials: Notorious, DVD player, Reading in the Dark text, blank POV ws

Day 7

Objectives (SWBAT):
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Read/Discuss “There Will Come Soft Rains,” focusing on characterization.
  2. Review the 2nd column of the characterization w/s – see Golden p. 163.
  3. Monitor students as they complete a plot map for “There Will Come Soft Rains.”
  4. Read/Discuss “There Will Come Soft Rains,” focusing on characterization.
  5. Complete the 2nd column of the characterization w/s – see Golden p. 163.
  6. Complete a plot map for “There Will Come Soft Rains.”
  1. Read/Discuss “There Will Come Soft Rains,” focusing on characterization.
  2. Complete the 2nd column of the characterization w/s – see Golden p. 163.
  3. Complete a plot map for “There Will Come Soft Rains.”
Assessments: HW: Finish “There Will Come Soft Rains” plot map; In Class: characterization w/s
Materials: “There Will Come Soft Rains” text, characterization w/s, blank plot map w/s

Day 8

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Use a visual form of characterization in The Breakfast Club to understand the literary element.
breakfast_club.jpg
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Collect “There Will Come Soft Rains” plot map.
  2. Analyze The Breakfast Club film clip with students, highlighting characterization:
- Read The Breakfast Club clip summary – see Word document.
- Show key segment: 0:08:01-0:14:36.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0f-I6WI3QQ
- Discuss Q?s – see Word document.
- Review first column of characterization w/s – see p. 163.
  1. Hand in “There Will Come Soft Rains” plot map.
  2. Analyze The Breakfast Club film clip, highlighting characterization:
- Hear The Breakfast Club clip summary – see Word document.
- Show key segment: 0:08:01-0:14:36.
- Discuss Q?s – see Word document.
- Complete first column of characterization w/s – see p. 163.
Assessments: In Class: The Breakfast Club discussion and Q?s, characterization w/s
Materials: The Breakfast Club, DVD player, Reading in the Dark text, characterization w/s

Day 9

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Read/Discuss “The Monkey’s Paw,” focusing on symbolism.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Read/Discuss “The Monkey’s Paw,” looking at symbolism:
- Have students complete the bottom section of the symbol tally sheet – see Golden p.165.
- In partners, have students complete a plot map for the story.
  1. Read/Discuss “The Monkey’s Paw,” looking at symbolism:
- Complete the bottom section of the symbol tally sheet – see Golden p.165.
- In partners, complete a plot map for the story.
Assessments: In Class: Symbol tally w/s, “The Monkey’s Paw” plot map
Materials: “The Monkey’s Paw” text, symbol tally w/s, blank plot map graphic organizer

Day 10

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • Use a visual form of symbolism in Psycho to understand the literary element.
psycho.jpg
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Analyze Psycho film clip with students, highlighting symbolism:
- Read Golden’s summary - see p 84.
- Show Golden’s segment: 0:34:26 – 0:44:08.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXT-z2cOd3A&feature=related
- Discuss Golden’s Q?s on pp. 84-86.
- Monitor students as they complete the top portion of the symbol tally sheet – see Golden p. 165.
  1. Analyze Psycho film clip studying symbolism:
- Hear Golden’s summary – see p 84.
- Watch Golden’s segment: 0:34:26 – 0:44:08.
- Discuss Golden’s Q?s on pp. 84-86.
- Complete the top portion of the symbol tally sheet – see Golden p. 165.
Assessments: HW: Finish symbol tally sheet; In Class: Psycho discussion, symbol tally w/s
Materials: Psycho, DVD player, Reading in the Dark text, symbol tally w/s

Day 11

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • From a film perspective, storyboard one of the short stories studied in the unit.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Collect symbol tally w/s.
  2. Lead a class exploration of the Storyboarding 1 activity – see Golden pp. 53-36:
- Complete the Storyboarding 1 ws – see Golden p. 160.
  1. Explain the Storyboarding 2 activity – see Golden pp. 56-58:
- Monitor students as they work in collaborative learning groups to complete 3 of the Storyboarding 2 activities (see Golden p. 161) with one of the short stories studied.
  1. Hand in symbol tally w/s.
  2. Explore the Storyboarding 1 activity – see Golden pp. 53-56:
- Complete the Storyboarding 1 w/s – see Golden p. 160.
  1. Receive the Storyboarding 2 activity – see Golden pp. 56-58:
- In collaborative learning groups, complete 3 of the Storyboarding 2 activities (see Golden p. 161) with one of the short stories studied.
Assessments: In Class: Storyboarding 1 and 2 activities
Materials: Reading in the Dark text, short story texts, Storyboarding 1 w/s, Storyboarding 2 w/s

Day 12

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • From a film perspective, storyboard one of the short stories in the unit.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
1. Monitor students as they work in groups on their Storyboarding 2 activities.
1. Work on the Storyboarding 2 activities in groups.
Assessments: HW: All unit materials are due tomorrow; In Class: Storyboarding 2 activities
Materials: Storyboarding 2 w/s, chart paper and short story texts

Day 13

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • From a film perspective, storyboard one of the short stories in the unit.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
  1. Collect any missing unit materials.
  2. Monitor students as they finish working on the Storyboard 2 activities.
  3. Hand in any missing unit materials.
  4. Work on the Storyboarding 2 activities in groups.
  1. Hand in any missing unit materials.
  2. Work on the Storyboarding 2 activities in groups.
Assessments: In Class: Storyboarding 2 activities
Materials: Storyboarding 2 w/s, chart paper and short story texts

Day 14

Objectives (SWBAT):
  • With group members, present Storyboard 2 charts in front of the class.
Procedure:
Teacher will:
Student will:
1. Assess students as they present their Storyboard 2 activities to the rest of the class.
1. Present Storyboard 2 charts to the class, demonstrating knowledge of the literary elements and film techniques studied in the unit.
Assessments: In Class: Storyboarding 2 presentation
Materials: Storyboard 2 charts
REFERENCES
Bradbury, R. (2000) There will Come Soft Rains. Logan, IA: Perfection Learning.

Dahl, R. (2006). Collected stories. New York City, NY: Random House.

Foundation, The Film. (2002). The National Film Study Standards. http://www.storyofmovies.org/standards/index.htm

Golden, J. (2001). Reading in the dark: Using film as a tool in the English classroom. Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.
Hitchcock, A. (Producer and Director). (1946). Notorious [Motion picture]. United States: Vanguard Films.

Hitchcock, A. (Producer and Director). (1958). Vertigo [Motion picture]. United States: Paramount Pictures.
Hitchcock, A. (Producer and Director). (1960). Psycho [Motion picture]. United States: Shamley Productions.

Hughes, J. (Producer and Director). (1985). The Breakfast Club [Motion picture]. United States: Universal Pictures.
Jacobs, J. (1979). The three little pigs. New York City, NY: William Morrow & Co.
Jacobs, W. W. (2005). The monkey’s paw and other tales of mystery and the macabre. Chicago, IL: Academy Chicago Publishers.
Poe, E. A. (1983). The tell-tale heart and other writings. New York City, NY: Bantam Classics.
Smilanich, B., & Lafreniere, N. (2010). Reel teaching = real learning: Motivating reluctant
students through film studies. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 53 (7), 604-606.
Teasley, A. B., & Wilder, A. (1997). Reel conversations: Reading films with young adults.
Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers.

APPENDIX A
Overview Notes for Literary Terms

Protagonist – the main character that experiences a problem in the story
Antagonist – the character or stimulus that causes the problem for the protagonist in the story
Characterization – the appearances, personality, mannerisms of a person in the story. The characterization can drive the plot, tone, style and theme of a story.
Exposition – the initial introduction of the story, where the setting and characters are introduced
Setting – the when and where of the story
Plot – the basic storyline of the story, including the rising action, climax and falling action
Rising Action – the events that lead up to the climax of the story
Climax – the most important point of the story, where the protagonist experiences an ultimate event or decision
Falling Action – the events that occur after the climax
Conflict/Resolution – the problem(s) and the results of the problem(s) that the protagonist experiences throughout the plotline
Theme – the life lesson(s) that the story supplies to the reader
Point of view – the vantage point from which the story is told, including first person, third person limited, or third person omniscient
Symbol – a word or object that stands for another word or object, which may or may not be tangible
APPENDIX B
Worksheet - Point of View in Film (modeled from John Golden)

Subjective

Shot #1
Shot #2
Shot #3



Description: _

Authorial

Shot #1
Shot #2
Shot #3



Description: _

Neutral

Shot #1
Shot #2
Shot #3



Description: _

APPENDIX C
Summary and questions for The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club (John Hughes, 1985)
Key Sequence: (0:08:01-0:14:36) Chapter 4 on DVD
During this sequence, the characters give us a glimpse of who each of them are: a jock, a nerd, a princess, a criminal, and an outcast. The students have to serve a Saturday detention in the library of their school. From the beginning, it is quite obvious that the students don’t associate with each other during the normal school day. The individuality is set in stone with the way the students dress (careful mise-en-scene here). The principal announces that the students will have to write an essay while serving detention today. He makes it clear that he does not want “any monkey business.” After his departure from the library, the students all quarrel with the criminal, who tries to stir up trouble. The students evidently stereotype each other based on their interests and participation (or lack thereof) school activities.
Discussion Questions
  1. How are each of the students labeled? Describe how you know what each student’s stereotype is.
  2. If you could pick one character’s brainstorm list for the required essay, what would it look like? List the brainstorm ideas and label which character is the author of your list.
  3. Predict the “monkey business” that might occur in the library throughout the duration of the detention day.
  4. What similarities do you see in the film’s students and our students at this school? What conclusion can you make based on the similarities?

APPENDIX D
Blank plot map template
http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson800/IdentifyPlot.pdf
APPENDIX E
PDFs of Golden text










































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